The Advancements in Technology and the Beauty in Recreated Art

By Ashley Limas

Technology is absolutely incredible. We are learning about new advancements practically every single day in the technology world. We have only had computers for a short period of time, but the things we have done with them is almost unimaginable. The tech world is truly where art and science meet. The things people can do with design software are beautiful. Digital artists are extremely innovated and creative. They can create masterpieces out of thin air.

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Source

Digital artist Jean-Charles Debroize was put up to the task, by the creative software company Adobe, to re-create a historical lost painting using nothing but stock photos that were preloaded into the software. The painting he was tasked with was the beautiful Caravaggio’s Saint Matthew and the Angel. This painting was destroyed during the second world war in an allied bombing attack.

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The painting features a Saint Matthew and an angel and was originally created as an oil on canvas piece by Caravaggio in 1602. The Contarelli Chapel in Roam commissioned him to do the piece.

 

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Source (Actual Painting on Left, Recreated on Right)

Jean-Charles Debroize’s rendition of Saint Matthew and the Angel is strikingly similar to the original piece. Through it’s beautiful digital rendering we get a sense that our lost art can be brought back to life through digital media. What was once considered “gone forever” can now be remade with a skilled digital hand.

 

Artists can do so much with the new technology that is constantly developing. It is so amazing to see all the wonderful and beautiful things that people are creating. As technology advances we can do so much more and really make the world a more beautiful place. It is so exciting that artists are using technology to enhance their art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources

http://bit.ly/2f6WtjC

http://bit.ly/2eedqGa

Published by

UNT Eagle Strategies

Class members of the social media class in the Mayborn School of Journalism