Social Media Here and Now

Social Media Here and Now
By Cameron Harlow

Social media has taken the world as we know it into a completely different state. It has changed the way we live in a matter of years. Ten years to be exact. The first “social media” site was originally created in 1997. In 10 years alone, we have gone from a technologically round world to a technologically very flat world.

Through this new connection of the world, we are able to communicate easier and quicker than ever before. But is this change strictly positive? Or does it have implications we could be facing fairly soon?

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With the flattening of the world- easier connection and quicker communication- comes the merging of cultures. Hearing this, at first, is a great thing. We need to know more about the world to have better peace and understanding towards each other. But is this merger contributing to Americanization or the lack or breaking of tradition?

Some argue that that is the case. The intertwining of cultures through social media and the Internet could cause a lack of major cultural differences. The factors that cause the flattening of the world are split into seven categories, but all work to make the world more closely knit. Not a bad thing for world peace and acceptance, but maybe something to think about before we go jumping into different cultures without thinking. It is important to honor and respect other’s heritages. It’s important to keep the world diverse to allow us to grow as a worldly community. Just something to think about.

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Published by

UNT Eagle Strategies

Class members of the social media class in the Mayborn School of Journalism