Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook’s fight against fake news

By Cesar Valdes

As I groggily viewed my Facebook feed, I saw a shared post by an old high school classmate. The headline read something along the lines of ‘Boy shoots man who has been raping his mother’.

When I read that knee jerking headline, I had hundreds of questions run through my mind. And, unsurprisingly, as I finished reading the short 200-some-odd-word article, I came away with not a single answer.

No names were used from the victims or the accused, there weren’t any names of the judge, hardly any information on the state and city it took place in, or any accounts of the accusations.

But yet, many people shared the post in total disgust of what they believed what a true story. In reality, they should be disgusted at the person who created that ‘article’.

Ever since the fallout of this past presidential election, Facebook has been fighting the surge of fake news sites that are widely shared throughout their website.

Recently, Facebook has begun to explain to their users different ways they can spot fake news.

Facebook

Photo credit: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-how-to-spot-fake-news-2017-4

To be fair, the tips provided are good and can help some people avoid fake sites (if they actually read the tips).

On April 13, Facebook made its greatest progress yet by suspending over 30,000 fake accounts stemming from France.

Interestingly enough, this came ten days before the French presidential election.

It seems as if Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has changed his stance on the impact of fake news on the U.S. presidential election with this move.

Facebook also bought full page ads on local newspapers in both France and Germany with similar guidelines to promote their efforts.

Still, Facebook’s efforts are only the start to combat what has become the giant fake news industry. There’s going to have to be greater measures to take down fake news as they will continue to find ways to put themselves in the eyes of the public.

Published by

UNT Eagle Strategies

Class members of the social media class in the Mayborn School of Journalism