How much social media can we take before needing a break?

By Cesar Valdes Blog 1/2

Have you ever been on social media so much that you decided to take some time off from the never-ending cycle of news and commentary?

Me neither. It’s actually very entertaining.

However, according to a poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, nearly 60 percent of 790 teenagers polled in the United States have taken a hiatus from their social media sites.

The poll surveyed teens between the ages of 13 and 17. It also indicated that a large portion of these teens took it upon themselves to take their break. Less than half of these teenagers were forced off social media by their parents.

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Some of these teens said they enjoyed the connections they make through social media, while another portion believed it was a place full of negativity.

Of the teens surveyed, half of them had breaks of at least a week. The survey also concluded that boys are more likely to take longer breaks than girls. During these breaks, many of the teens felt a sense of relief and even began to connected better with the people around them.

But most of the breaks were short lived. Despite feeling less stressed and more relief, they stated that everything went back to normal once they returned back to their social media sites.

It’s an interesting trend that’s going on given the increasing popularity of social media and the access to it all.

If there’s one thing for certain, however, it’s that social media is only adding to the Age of Information.

The survey concluded that boys were more likely to feel overwhelmed with information and that girls felt the pressures of to constantly impress their audience.

There are still some limitations to the poll, though. For starters, the survey was only conducted between Dec. 7 to 31. Secondly, it was done over the phone and online through minors, which created some problems as well. Parents would have to give consent for their children to be interviewed by the panel, AmeriSpeak. The margin of sampling error was calculated at plus or minus 4.6 percentage.

Sources:

http://www.pcmag.com/news/353360/poll-even-teens-need-social-media-breaks

http://www.kentucky.com/news/business/article147124509.html

Image credit: Paul Sakuma, File AP Photo

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UNT Eagle Strategies

Class members of the social media class in the Mayborn School of Journalism