Make a Real Change

by Kimsua Lam

“Change your profile picture to support France and the people of Paris,” suggests Facebook as I scroll through my news feed the morning after the terrorist attacks devastated the city of Paris.

I wasn’t quite sure how I felt about that. At first, I was a little annoyed. As time passed and as I read more updates on the state of the people of Paris, my heart continued to swell with sadness. I started to notice that my Facebook news feed became a sea of red, white, and blue conformity. At this point, I felt a little indifferent.

Then, I read a story about a woman who, during an attack, held her loved one in her arms as his life slowly writhed away from her grasp. The irony in that article wielded a stream of tears from my eyes. The more stories like these that I read, the more my anger had caught up with my sadness. That’s when I noticed that one of the filters I saw on someone’s profile picture had read “temporary.”

Temporary – that’s exactly what this kind of “support” was. You could actually decide when you wanted to end your support. Let that sentence marinate for a minute. Is this what society has become? A place where support and compassion make their bed in social media and become frivolous and short-term? That’s when I decided that the Facebook filter was diminutive as compared to what one can really do to support those who survived the attacks in all of its horror.

Horror – that’s what these people endured and are still struggling to endure. The attacks have come to a halt, but the pain, the heartache, and the emotional turmoil that these people are left with will continue to burgeon. Will my Facebook filter work to temper away the pain – both physical and emotional?

As a supplement to applying a filter to “show your support” for the people of Paris, how about making a donation to local organizations like the French Secours Populaire, Friends of Fondation de France, Inc., or The Secours Catholique-Caritas France?

As a supplement to applying a filter to “show your support” for the people of Paris, how about donating blood to the French National Blood Service if you are in Paris or a neighboring community?

As a supplement to applying a filter to “show your support” for the people of Paris, how about following and participating with the hashtag #PorteOuverte, which means “Open Door” and is used for providing your home as shelter to French citizens who may be stranded by flight delays or by the closing of France’s borders in the wake of the attacks?

And while I do not disapprove of those who chose to apply the Paris filter, I am only making it a point that, perhaps, going a step beyond the filter can demonstrate your compassion and support more constructively.

Wouldn’t making a direct and positive impact have a more lasting effect for those in Paris who need more than just a red, white, and blue camouflage strewn atop our faces?

Food for thought.

Well-Known Photographer Shares Experience and Skills

Junebug

By: Jenna Chaffee

An eager photographer approached the Detroit Free Press in hopes of working with his idol, a photo editor named Charlie Haun. After the photographer was turned down, Haun reached out a few years later, asking if he’d be interested in a photography job.
Junebug Clark, freelance photographer of Detroit, Michigan, returned the call to Haun, asking what needed to be done for his first photo assignment at Detroit Free Press. He was excited to finally be given the opportunity to work with such a well-respected photo editor.

“Well Junebug, humanize the bastard,” Haun replied, in a cigar-smokers voice.

It was in that moment that Junebug Clark received the greatest advice of his life. Clark not only was given the opportunity to work with a photo editor that could show him how to take photos, and take photos correctly, but he received advice that he would carry with him for the rest of his photography career.

“I realize that was a great, great bunch of advice. Every assignment you take is going to be tough, you have to take it seriously and you’ve got to humanize it. Make it an interest to others,” Clark said.

Junebug Clark is currently the photography consultant in the Mayborn School of Journalism at the University of North Texas. On most days, you can find him informing students about photography and carrying around his camera, taking pictures of whatever he can get his lens on.

Clark enjoys capturing images of real people doing real things. His photos are not limited to people however; Clark once took pictures laying down in hog pens, covered in whatever you want to call it. He has previously shot for Budweiser, Time, Life, National Geographic and even Jack Daniels.

“I did a lot of work with Budweiser, for 38 years I did the Jack Daniel’s whiskey ads, and lots of work for another pharmaceutical. So basically, I’ve been heavy on the drugs and alcohol,” Clark said.

Clark is a second-generation photographer. His father picked up his first camera in 1938, has published 24 books and has shot hundreds of times for Life magazine. One of the reasons Clark is currently working at UNT is because he donated his first 50 pictures as well as all of his father’s collection to the UNT library.

“In 1938, the first time my dad picked up a camera, a guy gave him 36 exposures in total to shoot with. Fourteen pictures ended up in Life magazine. It wasn’t long after that, my father quit his job and became a photographer,” Clark said.

Clark has traveled to a record of 38 states in one year, allowing him to capture photos of children, airplanes, nature and animals. His friend and photography partner, Dan Moore, works alongside him. His shots include risqué angles, creative stunts and incredible photography skills.

“The neat thing about this profession is you get to go places and do things you typically wouldn’t be able to do. It’s really a neat thing,” Clark said.

For more information regarding Junebug Clark please visit:
http://www.junebugclark.net/Components/Frameset.html

How Facebook’s new universal search update will change social media for business.

facebook-search2-ss-1920

By: Abigail Hebert

Facebook is now giving Twitter and Google a run for their money with its new search engine update. This update will allow users to search the entire social media cite for almost anything you would want to see content about. . According to the verge.com results will come up in order “Starting with authoritative sources like news organizations, the search results will become more granular as you scroll down to what your friends are saying, liking and commenting on and then finally to strangers discussing the same topic”. Like Twitter, the user will be able to follow what people are saying and posting about trending topics on Facebook and like Google, search results will be tailored to the user based upon their previous search history and other activities on Facebook This opens up so many new opportunity for businesses. With this new development it is only a matter of time before someone comes up with a way to run analytics that will be able to let businesses know how often their business is being searched and how often they are getting hits on their page. The new search engine will also make it easier to monitor publicity about your company as well. The user will be able have a feed of trending topics related to their company. With this they will be able to address any customer complaint or questions more efficiently and more effectively. If all else the improvement of Facebook searches will make it easier for potential customers to find your Facebook and thus doings so will increase traffic to and engagement with your Facebook page itself. I am very interested to see not only how well this new update will be but to also see how companies will use this to their advantage and help create more business.

Sources: http://www.theverge.com/2015/10/22/9587122/new-facebook-search-all-public-posts

Photo: http://searchengineland.com/facebooks-hello-app-another-incremental-step-toward-local-search-219637

Digital Narcissism

By Rita W. Unogwu

Susana Vera / Reuters
Susana Vera / Reuters

Dictionary.com defines narcissism as an inordinate fascination with oneself; excessive self-love; vanity.

With the advent of social media in various forms and platforms, the rate of narcissism is on the increase. The need for others to see us doing the craziest things, attending grand occasions, being flawless, meeting important personalities has been the order of the day. Most times our inner self just screams “Me!” Look what i can do, look where i have been, i don’t think you have been there and the list can go on.

As harmless as it seems, a digital narcissist will hardly see him/herself as one. Slowly but ignorantly, such a person begins to care less about others around them. If they are not handing their phones to friends to take them several personal shots with different poses, then they are taking a selfie (with or without friends). They just must be part of the picture.

After the photo is taken, they scroll through, look for the best and if it is a group selfie, it has to be the one they think they look their best, haha, narcissism at its best. When the best is chosen, they edit it to look flawless before posting on Facebook, Intstagram or whichever platform they have more friends or get more likes. These are people that know them already and have been knowing them. So it is difficult to understand the need for wanting to be out there so much. Yes! “Excessive self love.”

Tomas Chamarro -Premuzic said,”Unsurprisingly, narcissism levels have been rising for decades. Such increases pre-date social media but they have clearly exacerbated since its emergence.” He adds that, “showing-off has never been easier and ironically, more celebrated.

Unfortunately, digital narcissism is detrimental to the material and social life of its prisoners. People try to be who they are not just for the sole purpose of impressing others. They try to emulate people they see on the red carpet. Hopefully they are confined to eating bread and peanut butter all day everyday just because they are spending their fortune on physical appearance.

Whatever happened to inner beauty? Just thinking.

think

LINKS

<http://www.theguardian.com/media-network/media-network-blog/2014/mar/13/selfie-social-media-love-digital-narcassism&gt;

<https://www.rt.com/op-edge/315210-digital-selfie-kill-photography/&gt;

<https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/2322262492/2rjkwtt7ro30vafxiicn.png&gt;

Digital Narcissism

By Rita W. Unogwu

Susana Vera / Reuters
Susana Vera / Reuters

Dictionary.com defines narcissism as an inordinate with oneself; excessive self-love; vanity.

With the advent of social media in various forms and platforms, the rate of narcissism is on the increase. The need for others to see us doing the craziest things, attending grand occasions, being flawless, meeting important personalities has been the order of the day. Most times our inner self just screams “Me!” Look what i can do, look where i have been, i don’t think you have been there and the list can go on.

As harmless as it seems, a digital narcissist will hardly see him/herself as one. Slowly but ignorantly, such a person begins to care less about others around them. If they are not handing their phones to friends to take them several personal shots with different poses, then they are taking a selfie (with or without friends). They just must be part of the picture.

After the photo is taken, they scroll through, look for the best and if it is a group selfie, it has to be the one they think they look their best, haha, narcissism at its best. When the best is chosen, they edit it to look flawless before posting on Facebook, Intstagram or whichever platform they have more friends or get more likes. These are people that know them already and have been knowing them. So it is difficult to understand the need for wanting to be out there so much. Yes! “Excessive self love.”

Tomas Chamarro -Premuzic said,”Unsurprisingly, narcissism levels have been rising for decades. Such increases pre-date social media but they have clearly exacerbated since its emergence.” He adds that, “showing-off has never been easier and ironically, more celebrated.

Unfortunately, digital narcissism is detrimental to the material and social life of its prisoners. People try to be who they are not just for the sole purpose of impressing others. They try to emulate people they see on the red carpet. Hopefully they are confined to eating bread and peanut butter all day everyday just because they are spending their fortune on physical appearance.

Whatever happened to inner beauty? Just thinking.

think

LINKS

<http://www.theguardian.com/media-network/media-network-blog/2014/mar/13/selfie-social-media-love-digital-narcassism&gt;

<https://www.rt.com/op-edge/315210-digital-selfie-kill-photography/&gt;

<https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/2322262492/2rjkwtt7ro30vafxiicn.png&gt;

Digital Narcissism

By Rita W. Unogwu

Susana Vera / Reuters
Susana Vera / Reuters

Dictionary.com defines narcissism as an “inordinate with oneself; excessive self-love; vanity.”

With the advent of social media in various forms and platforms, the rate of narcissism is on the increase. The need for others to see us doing the craziest things, attending grand occasions, being flawless, meeting important personalities has been the order of the day. Most times our inner self just screams “Me!” Look what i can do, look where i have been, i don’t think you have been there and the list can go on.

As harmless as it seems, a digital narcissist will hardly see him/herself as one. Slowly but ignorantly, such a person begins to care less about others around them. If they are not handing their phones to friends to take them several personal shots with different poses, then they are taking a selfie (with or without friends). They just must be part of the picture.

After the photo is taken, they scroll through, look for the best and if it is a group selfie, it has to be the one they think they look their best, haha, narcissism at its best. When the best is chosen, they edit it to look flawless before posting on Facebook, Intstagram or whichever platform they have more friends or get more likes. These are people that know them already and have been knowing them. So it is difficult to understand the need for wanting to be out there so much. Yes! “Excessive self love.”

Tomas Chamarro -Premuzic said,”Unsurprisingly, narcissism levels have been rising for decades. Such increases pre-date social media but they have clearly exacerbated since its emergence.” He adds that, “showing-off has never been easier and ironically, more celebrated.

Unfortunately, digital narcissism is detrimental to the material and social life of its prisoners. People try to be who they are not just for the sole purpose of impressing others. They try to emulate people they see on the red carpet. Hopefully they are confined to eating bread and peanut butter all day everyday just because they are spending their fortune on physical appearance.

Whatever happened to inner beauty? Just thinking.

think

LINKS

<http://www.theguardian.com/media-network/media-network-blog/2014/mar/13/selfie-social-media-love-digital-narcassism&gt;

<https://www.rt.com/op-edge/315210-digital-selfie-kill-photography/&gt;

<https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/2322262492/2rjkwtt7ro30vafxiicn.png&gt;