Social Media Forming Industries

By: KeAndra Hill

 

It’s no secret that social media has a driving influence on today’s society. Now many are receiving jobs just based of their social media presence and interactions.

In one case back in 2016, Brooklyn Beckham, sixteen-year-old son to David and Victoria Beckham, landed a job photographing for Burberry’s, at the time, latest fragrance campaign. The young man revealed this information through his Instagram and many became outraged with comments pertaining to this choice of photographer, stating that he only received the job due to his parents and that is an insult to other artist with the abilities. Burberry lashed back stating that the job was landed based off the young man’s talent and exposure that is vouched for through his over 5.9 million followers on Instagram.

This is just a reflection of how social media has influenced the fashion, art, and entertainment industries. And the influence is only growing larger, with every update and new addition to these platforms, social media is finding new ways to enhance their influences.

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Take Instagram Live for example, now users can stream videos in real-time on Instagram, allowing followers to stay even more connected and in to the personal lives of industry professionals. One designer, Tim Coppen, has actually decided to live stream his show through Instagram Live. The thing about Instagram Live is that once the video has streamed, the footage cannot be viewed again or replayed afterwards. The artist finds this to be most intriguing about the idea. It is a next level engagement for the ever-so- fast growing generations social media is set to target.

The level of consumer engagement has definitely made Instagram a favorite to the fashion industry. It is a very direct way to interact with consumers and allows for brand personalization to really be shown.

 

Citations:

Hoang, L. (2017, January 09). How Can Fashion Brands Capitalise on Instagram Live? Retrieved January 29, 2017, from https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/news-analysis/tim-coppens-to-stream-pitti-show-on-instagram-live

Hope, K. (2016, February 05). How social media is transforming the fashion industry. Retrieved January 29, 2017, from http://www.bbc.com/news/business-35483480

 

 

 

Social Media in Photography

By Tyler Plato

In today’s world, nearly everything is done on social media or online. Whether it be breaking news, scores of a football game or posting ads so people will buy your product. Photography is no different. I have been a photographer for a couple of years and have learned that you can NOT make it by just word of mouth. Yes, that is a good place to get started but that isn’t enough. You have to have a Facebook account, Instagram account, and a website so you can reach more people.

Instagram is a photo platform. If was built for just that. Its starting to transform into something more with the ability to post videos but it is mainly a photo site. Now there are certain times when you should post your work and each social media platform is different.

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Image Source: Fstoppers

According to Casey Berner, on Facebook “the best times to post is between 1-4 p.m., spiking around 3 p.m.” Some of this is true because when I post my photos, I seem to have more engagement during that time frame. Now some people will say that it all depends on where you live and maybe that’s true but no matter where I am or where my buddies are that are photographers, this is the time frame where we see the most interaction. Now with Instagram there is not really a great time to post. You have to put photos up at different times of the day and figure out when the optimal time is.

Posting pictures has never been easier because of Facebook, Instagram and even Twitter. We always want a photo of us to show how great we are. Now this affects photographers because say I photographed your son playing football and got a picture of him making a great catch. When you post that photo, your showing how great your son is and that may make the other players on the team think they aren’t as awesome as your son. “The worlds of Facebook and Instagram are hyperbolic, humble and not-so-humble brag fests of beautifully composed and filtered moments of adland perfection, a curated hyper reality that reality has a hard time keeping up with” (Florea, T.).

There are so many other photography social media sites such as Flickr and SmugMug that built solely for photographers and helping those photographers sell their work. But Instagram and Facebook help the photographer get his/her name out there and help them build a following. You also have to be careful what you post. Now most photographers will ask permission of the person they are taking photos of to make sure it is ok for them to post the photos but always make sure that it is something that you want to reflect on back on you. Always think, are these the photos that I want to represent me.

 

References:

Berner, Casey. (13 May 2015) “When You Should Be Posting Your Photography to Social Media | Fstoppers.”Retrieved 23 Sept. 2016. https://fstoppers.com/business/when-you-should-be-posting-your-photography-social-media-70648

Florea, T. (29 June 2016) “How Social Media Has Changed the Camera-and Photography-Forever.” Retrieved 24 Sept. 2016. http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/how-social-media-has-changed-camera-and-photography-forever-172320

Social Media and food: Two peas in a pod

If you ate a delicious meal but didn’t post it on social media, did you still eat it?

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(via Joy Kalu)

We live in a social media dominated world. Everywhere we look, people are on their phones scrolling through some social media platform. It has come to a point where we can basically say we know someone simply based on their social media presence.

Social media has brought to the forefront so many different aspect of life, from fashion to film, and everything in between, we can find pretty much any and every thing on some sort of social site.

One topic that has become a social media craze is food, also known as food porn. I’m pretty sure I speak for everyone when I say that I honestly receive a lot of pleasure and satisfaction when I look at pictures of beautiful food.

Food photography is a profession in and of itself, but social media has now made everyone with a camera and a plate of food a food photographer. Every time I go out to eat with friends or family, once the meal comes out, I make everyone pause and not touch their meals just so that I can get a really good picture of it to post to Snapchat. I even went on a “food adventure” throughout Austin, Texas for spring break just to post it all onto my Snapchat story.

When did enjoying a good meal with good people become enjoying a good meal with good people through the lens of our cameras?

While social media has brought so much positivity to our lives, it also seems to be taking away things as simple as interpersonal communication. We barely even talk to each other in person anymore; we send each other snapchat videos of what we want to say or what we are seeing or doing. On the other hand, at the same time, the use of social media in the Food industry is often what makes or breaks a restaurant or chef. I know I would rather go to a restaurant with a strong social media presence than one that seems to not even know how to properly promote their food.

Whether we like it or not, social media and food are like two peas in a pod and it’s something we are all going to have to accept. Social media has helped to bring the beauty and the culture of food to the forefront of society and that is just one more defining factor of the new digital age.

 

https://www.menulog.com.au/blog/author/nicknedeljkovic/. “How Social Media Is Changing The Way We Eat – Menulog Blog.” Menulog Blog. N.p., 21 Oct. 2014. Web. 18 Sept. 2016. <https://www.menulog.com.au/blog/social-media-changing-eat/&gt;.

Ruiz, Michelle. “Instagram Feeding Frenzy: How ‘Influencers’ Are Changing the Food Scene.” Bon Appétit. N.p., 11 Apr. 2016. Web. 18 Sept. 2016. <http://www.bonappetit.com/entertaining-style/trends-news/article/rise-of-influencers-ruining-everything&gt;.

The Student Becomes the Master

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photo courtesy of mandiberg.com

By: Jessica Oswald

There is this text book that I am currently renting called The Social Media Reader, it is a group of articles centered on social media that were brought together to make one book. Now I normally have trouble reading textbooks and when I do read them I don’t usually pay attention to what I am reading, hence all the bad grades I get when I have to do a reading quiz. But when I read the first chapter, it really got my attention. The chapter is called “The People Formally Known as the Audience” by Jay Rosen, it is written kind of like a “To whom it may concern…” letter basically telling big media that social media is here and it isn’t going away, that the audience that news channels once broadcasted to is now broadcasting their own news, that the audience is now creating their own podcasts, and blogs, and videos, that, with the help of social media, we the audience can be just as creative and informative as big media. Now thanks to the wide spread use of Social Media, anyone can become a Big Media mogul.

“We graduate from wanting media when we want it to wanting it without filler, to wanting media to be way better than it is, to publishing and broadcasting ourselves when it meets a need or sounds like fun.” (Rosen 14)

And that is what lures people into using social media. The audience can create their own media, on their own time. Take Youtubers for example, there are many people who started making videos of themselves just sitting in their bedrooms, and talking about their lives and. Now they are writing books, making movies, and getting their own T.V. shows. They used social media to their advantage and it’s paying off (pun intended). The chapter goes on to say that Old Media is still needed and wanted, however, media isn’t a one way street anymore. Now, the audience has become the media professionals.

 

Rosen, Jay. “The People Formerly Known as the Audience.” The Social Media Reader. Ed. Michael Mandiberg. N.p.: New York UP, 2012. 13-16. Print.

Social Media Fuels the Beauty Revolution

By Phyllis Lynch

Beauty brands are marketed through various channels to grasp consumers. Social media is an online network that has taken the promotion of these brands by storm. Both major and smaller brands benefit from the ability to develop an online presence without a costly marketing budget.  Platforms like YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat frequently introduce consumers to an array of beauty products.

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Nickel Genesis; YouTube Beauty Vlogger

The cosmetic industry’s target market is coincidently the largest demographic of social media users. This has enabled brands to be in continuous contact with their projected audience. Millennials, born between 1980 and 2000, are the frontrunners for utilizing the latest methods in digital retailing. Neustar surveyed 1,020 purchasers to determine different shopping preferences between Millennials and Baby Boomers. The study also shows that 54% of Millennials consider their mobile device the most important shopping research tool, followed by 31% for desktop, 8% for television and 7% for print.

Often times consumers seek out reviews of beauty products before deciding whether to purchase them, this is where implementing the world’s second largest search engine and social media platform, YouTube, is essential. YouTube is known as the go-to for beauty tips, tricks and tutorials; it is has made learning about makeup more inclusive. Brands are able to gain exposure by offering beauty gurus and influencers incentives in exchange for product reviews. According to a 2015 report conducted by Pixability, there are 45.3 billion total beauty video views on YouTube. Fifty-five percent of those views come from mobile devices, which closely correlates to the percentage of Millennials that mainly use their mobile device as a retail research tool.

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Colourpop Cosmetics’ Ultra Matte Lip swatches

Social media has influenced and encouraged diversity by giving women with darker complexions an outlet to showcase and promote their beauty. These women have been notoriously ignored by the cosmetic industry. Major companies have been criticized for featuring one to only a few deep shades, while offering a range of fair-toned shades. It’s not like the demand for deep toned makeup products is nonexistent, with African American spending $7.5 billion on cosmetic products annually.

Some companies have noted the complaints and made strides to incorporate product diversity, which has earned them rave reviews. Examples of this are L’Oréal Paris’ latest campaign and Colourpop Cosmetics, which grew in popularity because it uploads makeup swatches on different skin tones. Online networking gives women of color a platform to voice frustrations, as well as share beauty tips that would otherwise be inaccessible due to a lack of mainstream diversity.

 

References:

Burstein, Daniel, and Liva LaMontagne, Dr. “Ecommerce Chart: Online Shopping Behaviors of Millennials versus Baby Boomers.” MarketingSherpa. N.p., 28 July 2015. Web. 11 Sept. 2016. https://www.marketingsherpa.com/article/chart/online-shopping-behaviors-based-on-age

Nouril, Perdita. “L’Oréal Paris’ Latest Campaign Breaks down Racial Barriers in Beauty.” The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group, 30 Aug. 2016. Web. 11 Sept. 2016. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/beauty/skin/loral-paris-latest-campaign-breaks-down-racial-barriers-in-beaut/

Pixability, Inc. “Beauty on YouTube 2015.” Beauty on YouTube 2015 Report. N.p., 2015. Web. 11 Sept. 2016. http://www.pixability.com/industry-studies/new-beauty/

Smith, Stephanie D. “Essence Panel Explores Beauty Purchasing.” WWD. N.p., 18 May 2009. Web. 11 Sept. 2016. http://wwd.com/beauty-industry-news/color-cosmetics/essence-panel-explores-beauty-purchasing-2139829/