Snapchat Me That Filter

 

(Via Eliah Davila)

BY: ELIAH DAVILA |@essenceofeliah

I am a young woman that loves snapping selfies, but I also love keeping up with snap streaks on none other than Snapchat! Young and old most of the population knows what Snapchat is. What is more popular than the app itself you may ask? The famous Snapchat filters of course. Every user has their favorite filter the dog, vomiting rainbows, or maybe the infamous flower crown. To give a little background about what I am talking about the app uses face recognition technology to attach and transform your face to many different themes. Some marketers have used this feature to promote businesses for a certain amount of time. Gatorade has used it to digitally pour Gatorade on your head and Taco Bell has used the feature to turn your face into a hard taco. I never paid much attention to the feature until recently. Last week I was sitting in my car waiting for class to start then I began to play with the new Snapchat filters. This day Snapchat had filters that only effected the change of your facial features and added aesthetic changes like longer lashes and clearer skin. I also decided not to wear makeup this day so when I used the filter then looked at the picture of myself I was taken back by the drastic changes. This filter was far beyond making me a Starbucks unicorn, this filter photo shopped my face and imperfections with one click of a button. I was not upset by the difference of the photos because what else do you expect from an app. Although, as I took on the internet to see if anyone else was amazed by the filter’s results to my surprise many people have an opinion on how Snapchat alters user’s facial features. There is much talk over social media saying that Snapchat is using filters to uphold the unrealistic beauty standard that is pushed to consumers. I believe Snapchat from a business prospective is not trying to uphold an ideal beauty. I believe the company is making an effort to stay afloat in the app industry by providing all things in one app. Snapchat using such drastic filter settings is what helps keep the app ranked above picture editing apps like Facetune and other photo shopping apps. Snapchat is ranked above all social media apps and for reasons like offering so much like a photo enhancement in just one touch is a genius marketing plan.

 

References

Burhop, B. (n.d.). Is This Snapchat Filter Creating Unrealistic Beauty Standard – Insider Tip – DailyBeauty – The Beauty Authority – NewBeauty. Retrieved from https://www.newbeauty.com/blog/dailybeauty/9814-snapchat-beauty-filter/

Dash, K. (2016, May 18). The Reason Why You Love the Dog Filter on Snapchat | Allure. Retrieved from http://www.allure.com/story/snapchat-dog-filter

Liquido, K. (2016, June 1). Why I’m Sick of Snapchat’s Photoshopping and Sexualizing Lenses – Verily. Retrieved from http://verilymag.com/2016/06/snapchat-lenses-social-media-beauty-photoshop

Vasquez, N. (2016, June 6). 11 Examples of Branded Snapchat Filters & Lenses That Worked. Retrieved from https://medium.com/comms-planning/11-branded-snapchat-filters-that-worked-94a808afa682

Wylde, K. (2017, April 20). How To Use The Unicorn Frappuccino Filter On Snapchat & Unleash Your Inner Magical Goddess. Retrieved from https://www.bustle.com/p/how-to-use-the-unicorn-frappuccino-filter-on-snapchat-unleash-your-inner-magical-goddess-52544

Social Media in Higher Education

By Josh Lawson | @JoshKLawson

 

Social media can be a hard concept to grasp. Most people say you need to be a master in something before you try to teach it to others. That way you can reword difficult concepts to students who don’t understand it. The medium of social media is constantly evolving and expanding. It’s often used in higher education to offer social CRM, but for students. It humanizes professors and can give a sense of ownership on the content we create.

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The fact that social media is changing means that whoever teaches it needs to evolve with it. The platforms will change, but the basics will always stay the same, but that doesn’t mean it still isn’t a time-consuming industry. You constantly have monitor several different account and hashtags, learn everything that changes with each update, and experiment with new features that each platform offers.

Many students, faculty, and sometimes even professionals have no idea how to use any aspect of social media. This means there is a huge disconnect between the brand and the consumers. The most successful accounts on social media platforms are those who show the most personality in their content, have a social CRM strategy, and act like an actual person instead of a computer generating lackluster content.

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Someone who teaches social media needs to have an excellent grasp on every concept surrounding the different platforms, rather than just the numbers and analytic data about them. Yes, that information helps, but not as much as hearing what it’s actually like to work in the industry using those tools and those platforms.

The information learned from someone who has professionally worked in the social media industry is invaluable. Those skills cannot be learned anywhere else. There is something completely different about learning vicariously from someone’s experience than learning from a PowerPoints and TEDtalks without trying to explain those any further.

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The skills learned with social media are based in customer service, public relations, journalism, and ethics. We learn these skills leading up to this course, or at least some of those skills. We don’t need to be learning the data and statistics for these platforms, but rather we need to be learning how to use social media in the real world.

Pepsi Co or Pepsi..NO?!

Photo Via Pepsi

Eliah Davila |@essenceofeliah

If you’ve been logged on to any social media platform this last week it was hard to ignore the Kendall Jenner slander. You may have chimed in or just watched the Pepsi advertisement yourself to catch up on the Jenner gossip and let it play itself out. Either way everyone online has agreed on one idea of the advertisement, it was bad. Not only does the advertisement try to represent people of all walks of life but it also stepped on many toes. The video advertisement had hip Kendall Jenner strip off her wardrobe from her modeling shoot and join a march of people with protesting signs. At the climax of the video Jenner hands a cop a Pepsi and the crowd follows with joyful cheers. Social media revolted against the video. No one defended the advertisement and it left everyone unsettled even led Pepsi to quickly pull the advertisement from the media. Pepsi gave their condolences to the public not defending the advertisement but explaining the company was aiming for “a global message of unity, peace and understanding” and continuing by admitting “Clearly we missed the mark, and we apologize”. This advertisement did get unity though. People like Martin Luther King’s daughter Bernice King spoke up against the advertisement tweeting “If only Daddy would have known about the power of #Pepsi” along with a photo of Dr.King being held back by a group of cops. Also, Black Voices Associate Editor at The Huffington Post Taryn Finley tweeted “Kendall Jenner gives a Pepsi to a cop and rids the world of -isms. Y’all can go somewhere with this tone-deaf, shallow and over-produced ad” disagreeing with the advertisement completely. Many users of twitter put their two cents in about the advertisement by adding memes and speakings about the insensitive message. Pop star Madonna made a point trying to defend not Pepsi but Kendall Jenner herself on an Instagram post captioning “When you wake up and realize that S*** just really doesn’t make sense. Side  Note: My Pepsi commercial was pulled 30 years ago because I was kissing a black saint! #ironic” following with a separate post of Madonna carrying a Coca-Cola can. If Pepsi’s goal was unity, the agreement is that all users of social media united to agree this advertisement was just not the solution the world needs.

 

 

Refrences

Eror, Aleks. “Kendall Jenner’s Pepsi Ad Is the True Face of Advertising.” Highsnobiety. Highsnobiety, 09 Apr. 2017. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.

France, Lisa Respers. “Why Madonna Is Drinking in the Pepsi Controversy.” CNN. Cable News Network, 06 Apr. 2017. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.

France, Lisa Respers. “Why Madonna Is Drinking in the Pepsi Controversy.” CNN. Cable News Network, 06 Apr. 2017. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.

PepsiCo. PepsiCO, 5 Apr. 2017. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.

Reeves, Rachel. “Social Media Mocks Kendall Jenner for Tone-deaf Pepsi Ad.” AOL.com. Abid Rahman, 05 Apr. 2017. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.

Smith, Alexander. “‘We Missed the Mark’: Pepsi Pulls Ad Featuring Kendall Jenner after Controversy.” NBCNews.com. NBCUniversal News Group, 05 Apr. 2017. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.

Watercutter, Angela. “Pepsi’s Kendall Jenner Ad Was So Awful It Did the Impossible: It United the Internet.” Wired. Conde Nast, 05 Apr. 2017. Web. 09 Apr. 2017.

Oscar my Tweets

By Abisola Adeyemi

This evening Oscars hosted their 89th award ceremony and i experienced it from the red carpet to the actual event from the comfort of my twitter feed. The hashtag #Oscars was pretty lit if i do say so myself.

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I experienced most from the official twitter account @TheAcademy account which was poppin’.

The page is following 1156 accounts which are majority of celebrities and other media organizations, and they are followed by 22.8k followers. The feed was updated every time there was something not to miss on the red carpet, a quote or when there was an Oscar winner.

I thought the award presentations via twitter were cool. This was a brilliant way for followers to experience the ceremony as if they were watching it or there themselves.

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This was the many of the twitpics shared to their twitter feed to honor award recipients.

The fact that it is a red envelope like the one presented at the ceremony was pretty cool.

They also featured quotes like this one from Emma stone, which captures in words the way she felt when she received her award for Actress in Leading Role.Screen Shot 2017-02-26 at 11.30.15 PM.png

Engagement during the show with the followers was high which ranged from 200-4.0 k likes or retweets.

I would say this was a remarkable evening for social media, a chance for the public to take part in the excitement of their favorite stars and directors received recognition of hard work.

I couldn’t help but to think of the team behind this account that made this happen. From the looks of how every moment from the show was updated The Academy’s social media team was on top of their “a game” i would say.

To show how much of an engagement twitter had on the ceremony.  Stars were chosen to read mean tweets about them. I thought this was awkwardly funny, particularly because the tweeters probably had no idea that their tweets would even make it to national television, but to see the reactions from the stars they talked about was priceless. They didn’t seem to be too bothered about it, it was all banter i would say.

Felt like we were all present and winning.

References:

https://twitter.com/TheAcademy

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C5o544GU4AAzoS2.jpg:large

https://twitter.com/jimmykimmel

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Lit

 

 

 

Is social media stressing us out?

By: Tiffany Ditto 

Social media users may experience higher levels of stress than non-users, according to a study released this week by the American Psychological Association.

The study asserts that higher engagement with technology causes users to feel more stressed, and brings in to question the impact Americans let social media have on their lives.

The participants in the study were divided into to two categories, constant checkers and non-constant checkers. Constant checkers are those who often engage in social media at work, and have work e-mails that keep them online. Non-constant checkers are those who use social media and the Internet daily, but do not feel the need to keep up with everything happening online.

“More than two in five constant checkers (42 percent) say that political and cultural discussions on social media cause them stress, compared to 33 percent of non-constant checkers. Additionally, 42 percent say they worry about negative effects of social media on their physical and mental health (compared to 27 percent of non-constant checkers),” according to the APA study.

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Percentage of users who report being stressed because of technology.| Photo credit: The American Psychological Association 2017 Stress in America Study. 

 

In addition to feeling higher levels of stress, the study found that a higher percentage constant checkers reported feeling disconnected from their families (44 percent, versus 25 percent for non-constant checkers).

In the age of constant connectivity, Americans should question the role technology plays in their lives. In 2016 as many as 78 percent of Americans had a social media profile.

In a world where we are all constantly connected it can be a challenge to turn off, tune out, and unplug. However, if anything can be learned from the APA’s study it’s that in order to be healthy we have to step away from the buzz and relax.

As many as “65 percent somewhat or strongly agree that periodically ‘unplugging’ or taking a ‘digital detox’ is important for their mental health,” the study reports.

Constantly worrying about the next thing Trump will tweet or about the latest e-mail from your boss on your day off isn’t healthy. Although stepping away can be scary at first the health benefits one will reap from the process are worth it. If you need help, here are some places many Americans cut out technology:

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Photo Credit: The American Psychological Association 2017 Stress in America Study 

What it’s Like to Tweet for A Living

By Josh Lawson | @JoshKLawson

 

The title is an oversimplification, to say the least. Nobody only posts on social media as a career. The CEOs of large companies will ask you to “drive engagement, or “measure ROI” in an online world. This is a lot for one person to complete. So, more often than not, you wear many different hats during your time on the job. You are a copywriter, designer, photographer, videographer, marketer, consumer specialist, facilitator, and, overall, a manager. By no means is this a comprehensive list of jobs someone with the job title, Social Media Manager, would do during a typical day.

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You ethereal online-based being are more than ROIs, engagements, and retweets/reblogs/shares. At you core you are journalists. You want to tell the truth that other companies aren’t telling their consumers. Social Media Managers want to tell the story of their brand, and be the best story out there. You are aware of the world around you, and the minuscule changes that are made daily, which have a butterfly effect on each platform of social media.

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To those of you who are looking for a similar position, I wish you luck. Your hours won’t be normal, a 9-5 isn’t in your future. Social media “crises” can appear at any time, and you have to ready at the drop of a hat to deal with it. Management is always breathing down your neck to see if what you do is actually necessary. Someone is always asking to “pick your brain” about social media tips. But, at the end of the day, you chose this job because you love pop culture, writing, designing, and getting to know your community, and nothing in the world would make you quit.

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The Viral Virus

By: Eliah Davila| @eliahpaige

After watching a TedTalk with guest speaker Kevin Allocca  a YouTube employee. This specific employee analyzes how videos go viral. Allocca points out that entertainment is now changed because of the way people can share anything at any time. An interesting statement he brings to light is “we don’t just enjoy now we participate” which this idea has changed our entertainment industry entirely. We can create and enjoying anything with only a few clicks. Users are in control with what they share but they do not have the control of how viewers react to the content. Many videos become viral without that intention.  Myself as a user if I find a video that intrigues me I automatically get the urge to share or comment on the video. Instantly, any video I share is broadcasted to my personal audience and that can also start a chain reaction from that point forward. With the internet, we can create and share content at a faster pace. Considering that companies like Buzz Feed where journalist’s jobs are to create a viral video. Companies like this take advantage of what is trending in our day to day lives to make a relatable video to its audience. After listening to other interviews with workers of Buzz Feed it has come to my realization that the content that Buzz Feed makes can become saturated. Although, even if the content they post can become excessive one of the fifteen videos can become a massive hit. These types of trends is what makes viral videos unique. Viral videos are unexpected and engaging. So after looking into both the TedTalk and the concept of YouTube it is obvious that us as users have the most control of what becomes a trending topic If we agree or not. Some may say that the internet is controlling us, but we are controlling the internet.

References

BuzzFeedVideo. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/user/BuzzFeedVideo

Webpage

Kevin Allocca: Why videos go viral | TED Talk | TED.com. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/kevin_allocca_why_videos_go_viral#t-59996